Lobby for Cyprus is a non-party-political human rights organisation campaigning for a reunited Cyprus.
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Media Watch 2003

19 September 2003
Source: Cyprus Weekly
Author:
Comment: The following editorial appeared in the Cyprus Weekly of Nicosia on 19 September 2003.
Straight talking. please


PRESIDENT Papadopoulos is known as a man who likes straight talk, rather than diplomatic gobbledegook or beating about the bush.

He should justify his reputation when he addresses the United Nations General Assembly next week for the first time since his election by describing the situation in Cyprus as it really is.

He should remind the General Assembly that this situation is one of foreign occupation, the toleration of the war crime of ethnic cleansing and other gross violations of human rights and the Geneva Conventions.

He should point out that this situation has been allowed to persist despite the numerous UN General Assembly and Security Council resolutions calling for the reunification of the island, the withdrawal of the Turkish troops and settlers and the return of the refugees to their homes.
He needs to remind all present, including the UN Secretary-General, that in addition to its contemptuous
rejection of the various UN resolutions, Turkey has also thrown into its waste paper basket the equally numerous judgements of the Human Rights Court of the Council of Europe that have found her guilty of gross human rights violations in the occupied north, imposing heavy fines on it for its refusal to make amends.

Most of the delegates of the world’s nations attending the General Assembly are probably aware of the Cyprus situation in general terms.

They need to be reminded of the details and the tragic fact that the international community continues to tolerate this situation and of the simple fact that Turkey treats the resolutions of the United Nations with the same contempt as the judgements of the Rights Court.

President Papadopoulos must not hesitate to appeal for the support of the General Assembly, asking it to reaffirm its resolutions at a time of intense pressure by those involved in the search for a settlement, including the UN Secretary-General himself, to persuade Cyprus, the victim of foreign aggression and occupation, to agree to painful compromises that ignore the UN resolutions and the Court judgements in a way that legitimises the Turkish crimes.

He should not hesitate to seek a new General Assembly resolution for no other reason than that this will make it incumbent on the Secretary-General to agree that his plan for the reunification of Cyprus must be amended to ensure compliance with both the UN resolutions and the Court judgements.

It is inconceivable that such a request will be turned down by the vast majority of UN member states, though those major powers that turn a blind eye to Turkey’s crimes may well continue to do so.

It is high time that Cyprus, even after so many years, made such an appeal to the body seen by many as the world’s conscience."