Lobby for Cyprus is a non-party-political human rights organisation campaigning for a reunited Cyprus.
Print this page Print Bookmark and Share
Media Watch 2003

20 September 2003
Source: Cyprus Mail
Author: Jean Christou and Gokhan Tezgor
Comment: The following article appeared in the Cyprus Mail of Nicosia on 20 September 2003.
December 14 set as date for elections in the north


ELECTIONS that will likely prove crucial to the future of the Cyprus issue will be held in the north on December 14, the Turkish Cypriot authorities announced yesterday.
A strong Turkish Cypriot political opposition has joined forces in the build-up to elections, seeking a
solution to the Cyprus problem based on the Annan plan, which Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash has rejected out of hand.

The combined opposition forces in the north hope to oust Denktash and resume negotiations with the Greek Cypriot side in order to reach a solution before the island joins the EU in May 2004.
‘Election Council President’ Taner Erginel told the Cyprus Mail yesterday: "The High Election Council has made its decision based on the law to hold the general elections on December 14.
"Parliament was hesitant on their decision on whether to hold the elections on December 7 or December 14, the council took this into consideration and made their decision," said Erginel.
The Turkish Cypriot assembly still has to make the final decision, but Erginel said this was just a formality and expected to rubbers stamp the decision and set the campaign schedule for the parties.
According to yesterday’s Halkin Sesi, the leader of the Solution and EU Party, Ali Erel said the presence of international observers during the elections was vitally important.

Opposition parties are worried at the growing number of Turkish settlers who have recently been granted ‘citizenship’, fearing the support they could give to Denktash and his two supporting parties.
Erel said that "the trustworthiness, transparency as well as the credibility of the negotiation team that will be appointed by the assembly following the elections, makes it imperative to have the presence of international observers at the elections.”

Opposition Republican Turkish Party (RTP) leader Mehmet Ali Talat told an interview with the pro-Denktash newspaper Vatan that Turkey’s presence in Cyprus was contrary to international law, and that Ankara’s main task in 1974 should have been the restoration of constitutional law in Cyprus.
“If Turkey has the pretension to be a regional power, it is not possible for it to be in dispute with international law. Therefore it has to solve the Cyprus problem,” Talat said.

Also yesterday, Talat urged the Greek Cypriot side to stop referring to the December elections as ‘pseudo elections’."
ELECTIONS that will likely prove crucial to the future of the Cyprus issue will be held in the north on December 14, the Turkish Cypriot authorities announced yesterday.
A strong Turkish Cypriot political opposition has joined forces in the build-up to elections, seeking a
solution to the Cyprus problem based on the Annan plan, which Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash has rejected out of hand.

The combined opposition forces in the north hope to oust Denktash and resume negotiations with the Greek Cypriot side in order to reach a solution before the island joins the EU in May 2004.
‘Election Council President’ Taner Erginel told the Cyprus Mail yesterday: "The High Election Council has made its decision based on the law to hold the general elections on December 14.
"Parliament was hesitant on their decision on whether to hold the elections on December 7 or December 14, the council took this into consideration and made their decision," said Erginel.
The Turkish Cypriot assembly still has to make the final decision, but Erginel said this was just a formality and expected to rubbers stamp the decision and set the campaign schedule for the parties.
According to yesterday’s Halkin Sesi, the leader of the Solution and EU Party, Ali Erel said the presence of international observers during the elections was vitally important.

Opposition parties are worried at the growing number of Turkish settlers who have recently been granted ‘citizenship’, fearing the support they could give to Denktash and his two supporting parties.
Erel said that "the trustworthiness, transparency as well as the credibility of the negotiation team that will be appointed by the assembly following the elections, makes it imperative to have the presence of international observers at the elections.”

Opposition Republican Turkish Party (RTP) leader Mehmet Ali Talat told an interview with the pro-Denktash newspaper Vatan that Turkey’s presence in Cyprus was contrary to international law, and that Ankara’s main task in 1974 should have been the restoration of constitutional law in Cyprus.
“If Turkey has the pretension to be a regional power, it is not possible for it to be in dispute with international law. Therefore it has to solve the Cyprus problem,” Talat said.

Also yesterday, Talat urged the Greek Cypriot side to stop referring to the December elections as ‘pseudo elections’."