Lobby for Cyprus is a non-party-political human rights organisation campaigning for a reunited Cyprus.
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Media Watch 2004

13 February 2004
Source: Haravgi
Author:
Comment: The following article appeared in Haravgi of Nicosia on 13 February 2004.
When contradiction bears madness…
"The alleged mutilation of human rights of a tortured people that has been trying for centuries now to hold on to this rock at the southeastern Mediterranean is infuriating and outrageous...When a Cypriot will be able to move freely and have the right to work, invest, live all over Europe, is it acceptable that he be banned from living in the house he was born?"

Small Cyprus, exceeding its capability, is rushing to catch up with the harmonization with the European Union. It establishes mechanisms, regulates its legislation and in general, it does the best it can. Our people anticipates the safety under the umbrella of the European Union rather than the alleged dream of a just and ideal world. In Europe that forbids the slaughtering of animals anywhere but in modern facilities, which meet the harsh requirements of hygiene conditions. In Europe that cares for the psychology of the animals prior to the slaughter and supervises the ways they are to be placed in storage.


Still, regarding the Cyprus issue, as it is clearly insinuated by certain EU officials –exaggerated at times in magnified statements, even triumphant at times so as to found their words – and certain Cypriots (members of the former government), it is stressed that exceptions and divergences from the acquis communautaire will be accepted. In other words, on issues of lesser importance, such as meat and vegetables, there is a strict demand regarding the harmonization, but for the minimum basic human rights there are backdoors? These contradictory messages, controversies and annulments bear madness. The alleged mutilation of human rights of a tortured people that has been trying for centuries now to hold on to this rock at the southeastern Mediterranean is infuriating and outrageous.

When a Cypriot will be able to move freely and have the right to work, invest, live all over Europe, is it acceptable that he be banned from living in the house he was born? Certainly, the Greek Cypriot side is ready to make sacrifices and knows very well, as we all know, that any kind of settlement on the basis of the Annan plan will not be ideal. Nevertheless, certain basic human rights ought to be ensured for all Cypriots.

This “beacon of democracy”, as they tend to call the EU, cannot but light certain aspects that are substantial and not trivial details. It is impossible that regarding this political issue there is a divergence from principles of vital importance and tolerance of the presence of occupation troops, while they remain intransigent regarding the harmonization of the slaughterhouses.

The Greek and Turkish Cypriots should live together as one people even if some are under Turkish Cypriot administration and the rest under Greek Cypriot administration. It is not possible that the faits accomplis of the invasion will be ratified and that we will be having good neighbouring relations as if we were two states. Equal citizens in a united country. The Cyprus issue is an international problem, an issue of invasion and occupation. There is absolutely no connection with what certain American-like think tanks have been saying that our problem is psychological and that we should find ways of avoiding conflicts. If the Cypriot people and the two communities were left to settle their differences without foreign interventions, they would be living like brothers. "