Lobby for Cyprus is a non-party-political human rights organisation campaigning for a reunited Cyprus.
Print this page Print Bookmark and Share
Media Watch 2005

08 February 2005
Source: Cyprus Mail letters
Author:
Comment: The following letter appeared in the Cyprus Mail of Nicosia on 8 February 2005.
Foreign vultures must leave Cyprus to solve its own problems
" The fact is the so-called peace plan would have relegated Cyprus to becoming some kind of protectorate, to existing upon the good will of countries like the UK, Turkey and ultimately (behind the scenes) the so-called freedom loving nation of the USA... If you want to envisage life under a United Cyprus Republic as that version, which was forced on the people of Cyprus, go to Episkopi RAF base and see that it is nothing but an American base in all but name. The same goes for Lefkoniko base in the occupied areas. Freedom, it seems, is only available to those who don’t have the misfortune of living in a strategic area or one that is rich in oil."

Sir,
Radar Resat’s letter published on February 5 (‘To all those Greek Cypriots who said No’) made interesting reading. The tone of it was an accusatory one, criticising Greek Cypriots for voting ‘no’ to the absurd Annan plan, and promoting a so-called United Cyprus Republic.

The fact is the so-called peace plan would have relegated Cyprus to becoming some kind of protectorate, to existing upon the good will of countries like the UK, Turkey and ultimately (behind the scenes) the so-called freedom loving nation of the USA.

True, Greece would have also retained intervention rights, but in reality what can Greece hope to achieve in attempting to exercise these rights in the future in the face of the other guarantors and their paymaster whose interests are more served than the people who have to live with such an irreversible arrangement?

Frankly, the Turkish Cypriot ‘yes’ vote was unreliable because their living standards would have an effect on them and they would be likely to have voted ‘yes’ to a dictatorship if it meant their economic situation would have improved.

If you want to envisage life under a United Cyprus Republic as that version, which was forced on the people of Cyprus, go to Episkopi RAF base and see that it is nothing but an American base in all but name. The same goes for Lefkoniko base in the occupied areas.

Freedom, it seems, is only available to those who don’t have the misfortune of living in a strategic area or one that is rich in oil.

Let the Cypriots decide what they want, real Cypriots, not immigrants brought to Cyprus by the shipload who were escaping an even worse existence, and one that is clearly explained without duplicitous slogans and ‘win-win’ false rhetoric.

Cypriots are not stupid, politically they are more sophisticated than, for instance, British citizens who have an ancient two-party system without credibility.

Let the powerful countries with interests walk away from Cyprus and allow all Cypriots to enjoy their country as other citizens elsewhere are able to.

One more thing, Cyprus is not made up of just Greeks and Turks, there are other minorities who see no problem in accepting what they are, a minority, living under the protection of a viable state, and are happy to be governed by a governed by a majority-rule government that sees no advantage in oppressing its own minorities and ignoring their existence, unlike the invading power.

Turkish Cypriots have to learn that Turkey is a foreign country, just like Greece, although it has tangible links to the population of Cyprus through history and ethnic heritage, much like Australia is to the UK and vice versa.

The so-called Cyprus problem will not be solved until the governments with interests in Cyprus realise that they cannot impose their own deluded ideas on a sovereign state and expect to have peace in the long term.

The fact is that Cyprus is an island inhabited by a majority of ethnic Greeks and a sizeable minority of Turks, as well as other minorities.

Let’s put aside any nationalistic delusions and superficial arguments and achieve the reality of a united island, without the unwelcome intervention of power hungry vultures circling to feed off Cyprus’ fortune (or misfortune) of having regional importance.

The Turks can demonstrate their willingness to solve this dilemma by removing that absurd Turkish flag on the mountainside and adopting a more mature approach to its people."