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Media Watch 2007

27 April 2007
Source: Cyprus Weekly
Author:
Comment: The following article appeared in the Cyprus Weekly of Nicosia on 27 April 2007.
Cypriots would still vote against Annan Plan – survey
THREE years after Cyprus rejected the Annan Plan, the majority of Cypriots still say they would vote against it.

"THREE years after Cyprus rejected the Annan Plan, the majority of Cypriots still say they would vote against it.

An Ant-1 poll found that 71.6% would vote "no," compared to 75.8% who rejected the plan. 22.6% would vote for it, compared to the 24.1% who were in favour of it in the 2004 referendum and 5.8% did not answer or said they did not know.

To the question posed whether Cyprus gained or lost after the Annan Plan referendum, of the 1,178 citizens quizzed in the survey, which was carried out in mid April, through the interview method, less than half, about 47.4%, said Cyprus gained, 32,6% said it lost out and 18% answered that the island's situation remained unchanged.

The survey, carried out by Evresis, said showed a total lack of trust in Turkey.

To the question whether Turkey would have kept to its obligations to return Greek Cypriot property and withdraw its troops from the island, 81.4% said no and 14.1% said yes.

About 42% of those who voted for the Annan plan believed that Turkey would not have kept its obligations, while less than half, 47.7%, said it would have.

According to party preference, 31% of Disy voters said they believed that Turkey would have implemented the provisions of the Annan plan, while the corresponding percentages in the three large parties of the coalition government were 11.2% for Akel, 10.8% for Edek and only 3.5% for Diko.

Seven in ten Cypriots consider the stance of candidates crucial for their vote in the presidential elections.

38.2% said they considered it very important, 28% saw it as quite important and 12.2% as slightly important.

One in five, 19%, said it was not important at all."